postgraduatepunk:

John Singer Sargent, Pagan Gods, 1895.

Astarte [left], Moloch [right].

In my opinion, the mural ensemble The Triumph of Religion, commissioned by the Boston Public Library, was the only really interesting painting John Singer Sargent ever did. His Pagan Gods, which adorns the north end of the vaulted ceiling, is a great example of a painter from another style accidentally making a Symbolist work.

tammuz:

Relief depicting the eagle-headed Assyrian god Nisroch (the word for eagle in Arabic is Nisr) on the walls of the Northwest Palace of king Ashurnasirpal II in Nimrud (883-859 BCE). The god Nisroch is associated with the Assyrian king Sennacherib, who conquered and destroyed Babylon and Judah in 700-701 BCE. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.
Photo by Babylon Chronicle

tammuz:

Relief depicting the eagle-headed Assyrian god Nisroch (the word for eagle in Arabic is Nisr) on the walls of the Northwest Palace of king Ashurnasirpal II in Nimrud (883-859 BCE). The god Nisroch is associated with the Assyrian king Sennacherib, who conquered and destroyed Babylon and Judah in 700-701 BCE. The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York City, NY.

Photo by Babylon Chronicle